Whose are we anyway?

There are so many things to love about being a parent.  Our own beloved Youth Minister, Mike Peterson and his wife Mary Bess, are spending their first Sunday as parents today, and I am confident they are staring into baby Theo’s sweet angelic face right this very minute, in awe of how much they love him already.  That is, unless they are “resting their eyes” and catching a few moments of silence as Theo sleeps away much of the daylight hours, saving up his energy for the “after-midnight show” he is sure to put on for his parents tonight.  Those first days are so full of love that in hindsight, we can almost forget the exhaustion and the piles of laundry and missed meals, once that phase of parenting moves on to the next.  Many new parents often remark that they didn’t know how much they could love another person until they first laid eyes on their children.  These times of utter adoration are surely intentional in God’s plan for creation, because they are often all we have to sustain ourselves as our children grow up to push the boundaries, working hard to separate themselves from identifying as only our children focusing instead on becoming individual people with lives all their own. As I reflect on this as an empty-nester parent, I can maybe….just maybe….get a glimpse into the tremendous and often complicated kind of love God must feel for us as God’s own creation.

The lectionary can be a rough place for both the preacher and the laity.  Sometimes, it delivers passages of scripture that are hard to hear, challenging to understand, and difficult to find meaning within. And sometimes, the lectionary has an almost magical quality, starting in some of our earliest texts and following a winding and connected path that gets us to the message of the Good News of Christ.  Today we have a bit of both with which to contend.  In today’s lectionary readings, we trace a progression which leads us to Jesus as the anointed one.  We start out in the Hebrew scriptures with a flowery description of a seemingly perfect expression of love, then move into the portion of the psalter from Psalm 45. In this psalm, one of the collection of so-called Royal Psalms, God is showing an abundance of radical love in the anointing of his servant through an outpouring of kinship with God our true king. In James, we hear of Christ’s birth as the “word of truth,” bringing us all the way to the divinity of Christ found in the gospel of Mark. This culmination of the Godship of Jesus is at the heart of this evangelist’s interpretation of who Jesus is for God’s people.

Jesus is having none of the foolishness of the Pharisees.  In reading and studying this gospel selection, I felt a little like an outsider stepping into someone’s family drama—midstream.  The Pharisees are desperate to hang on to their authority, and they do that the only way they know how – they throw down the rule of law to Jesus and his disciples.  For reasons that no longer exist in our modern world, which is filled with antibacterial soap, refrigeration, and a plethora of chemical additives which work to keep us from getting sick from our food, these religious purity laws were intended in part to keep folks free from illness.  And Jesus responds to their authority with an authority that can only come from God….and he challenges them the way all outdated and unnecessary laws that burden our society, especially burdening those in the margins, should be challenged.  He turns their purity codes LITERALLY INSIDE OUT.

For it is our insides – our thoughts, words, and deeds, which are of concern to Jesus, and he has no problem naming a few handfuls of examples of ways we live out our own selfish desires.  Ways that we live out our desires that serve to separate us from God – ways that are solely, our OWN doing.  Like the Pharisees, we worry about how something “looks” from the outside….perhaps spending more of our energy and chatter on our judgment of how things may appear.  We lament the state of the world today (thinking and saying things like…kids these days, or bemoaning the behavior of government officials, or arguing about whether taking a knee is appropriate during the national anthem)….we take dangerous risks when we focus on someone else’s outsides instead of our very own and often quite flawed insides.

“You must understand this, my beloved; let everyone be quick to listen, slow to speak, slow to anger; for your anger does not produce God’s righteousness.”  These words from our Epistle reading today from the book of James exhort us to action, to “be doers of the word, and not merely hearers who deceive themselves.” Peter Rhea Jones, a Baptist pastor and seminary professor remarks that we as Christians would do well to eschew the “deception of passive faith,” as we cast our eyes toward how OTHERS should be behaving rather than standing and carefully examining our OWN selves in the reflection in the mirror.  Who are we….really? Who are we reflecting in our life and work?  To whom do we belong?  And if we KNOW whose we are, then what are we called to do and who are we called to become?

As doers of the word, we will never be without fault.  We are still human, still with tendencies toward selfish actions and judgments.  But what would it look like if we were all committed to REALLY being DOERS OF THE WORD. Jesus challenges the religious beliefs of the day with an attempt to redirect back to God those who are within earshot of his words.  Back to God’s radical love of God’s people.  Back to the scriptures they knew so well; reminding them, and by extension reminding US that we are to honor God with our hearts as well as our lips.  And honoring God, bringing ourselves back into the membership of the communion of saints is to RE-MEMBER that we must accept God’s love AND send out God’s love to all.  While we are individuals with our own talents, callings, and gifts, we are united together in community with God and sent forth to spread love with our words and our actions. We must worry less about what is on the outside of those we meet and look at them in love, the way that God most surely sees us with God’s own eyes.

While Theo Peterson is just starting on life’s journey this week, our country carved out some significant time this same week to celebrate the lives of two very different, yet iconic figures in our society in Aretha Franklin and John McCain.  Neither was perfect.  Neither claimed to be.  But both were remembered as people who loved.  They were people of action, albeit in very different ways.  They were doers: Aretha using her position in tangible ways during the Civil Rights Movement;  McCain using his platform to hold others accountable for truth.  They were imperfect in life but created by God and surely welcomed at the feet of Jesus when their earthly life was finished.  They were so loved by God and as evidenced by the ways they have been honored in death, they loved and led others in ways that brought about change in their respective worlds.

We are created by God.  Loved by God.  Anointed by God.  Bestowed with gifts and talents from God.  Empowered by the gift of Christ to go forth and spread love into the world. We are doers of the Word.  How will you be remembered?  How will the church of God be known in the world today?  We know to whom we belong, and starting within our own selves, we can and we must work to join with Christ as we are called to do.  Called to join with Christ to bring about Christ’s kingdom.  Lord, what will you have me do?

Advertisements

One response

  1. Paige, this was a great message of love and acceptance. You are bringing it.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: